07:53

Brendan George Ko - Reminiscences (2008-10)

"We are observers to our past, and through time the memory of our history changes as we change.

I am searching for shades of myself, investigating my past, and finding captions that speak for each moment I had forgotten. Instead of a motorcycle, I use my feet for this journey; searching the terrain that surrounds me for my past self that has so rapidly changed over the course of half decade. And like the glass chamber that filled the dream of Phaedrus, I am only an observer to my history; completely powerless to influence change. But it is our history that makes who we are today, and it is who we are today that makes who we are tomorrow. Through my own investigation, I am reading old journal entries, and biographical fiction I wrote in different times of my life. My words will find themselves on windows of places that hold a certain memory, and after they are documented they will remain as mementos to remind me of this act as well as to engage to others who pass by. The sceneries behind these windows will be out of focus like the memory of the captions have faded through time, becoming less clear and less real. I was searching for my history, and I was learning who I was through my past, but I discovered my future in the process as I started a history with someone that was right in front of me this whole time. “

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via milagetinmykunis-deactivated201)

12:06

Do Not Enter Project 2007, 2011, 2012

by Dan Witz

11:38

Ornamental Thoughtfulness by Mary Whalley

In upcoming weeks a series of little bronze hands will be installed in central Wellington. In walkways, shortcuts and places people pass on their paths to work or school. Their purpose is to hold offerings. Anonymous tokens of generosity or thoughtfulness. My intention is that others will use the little hands too, for leaving small items.

03:14 inspirezme:

“Pulse Machine” is an electromechanical sculpture made by Alicia Eggert and Alexander Reben. It has been programmed to have the average human lifespan of approximately 78 years. The kick drum beats its heartbeat (at 60 beats per minute), and the mechanical counter displays the number of heartbeats remaining in its lifetime. An internal, battery-operated clock keeps track of the passing time when the sculpture is unplugged. The sculpture will die once the counter reaches zero. A very symbolic piece of work.

inspirezme:

“Pulse Machine” is an electromechanical sculpture made by Alicia Eggert and Alexander Reben. It has been programmed to have the average human lifespan of approximately 78 years. The kick drum beats its heartbeat (at 60 beats per minute), and the mechanical counter displays the number of heartbeats remaining in its lifetime. An internal, battery-operated clock keeps track of the passing time when the sculpture is unplugged. The sculpture will die once the counter reaches zero. A very symbolic piece of work.

(Source: ambedosense)

07:01 Black Alphabet, Fiona Banner, 2009
26 overprinted photocopied pages. Each letter section, from A-Z, of the Oxford English Dictionary reduced to one page. 29.7 x 42 cm
"I use dictionaries as a reference to life. I see the dictionary as a kind of poem about everything- it’s every story unmade and deconstructed."

Black Alphabet, Fiona Banner, 2009

26 overprinted photocopied pages. Each letter section, from A-Z, of the Oxford English Dictionary reduced to one page. 29.7 x 42 cm

"I use dictionaries as a reference to life. I see the dictionary as a kind of poem about everything- it’s every story unmade and deconstructed."

06:57

Duration Piece #11, Bradford, Massachusetts, 1969
Douglas Huebler (American, 1924–1997)
Gelatin silver prints

the artist shot a single photograph in the direction of a birdcall, then walked toward the source of the sound until he heard another, at which point he turned and made a picture facing the new birdcall, until twelve photographs had been created. With disarming simplicity, Huebler slyly redrew the parameters of the work of art, effacing both the subjective experience of the artist and the reified status of the art object in favor of an elegantly conceived and simply communicated idea which exists fully only in the viewer’s mind—a participatory aesthetic that is quintessentially of the late 1960s.



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